Personal Finance

This NY farmhouse was built in 1687 and is now listed for $1.3M: Take a look inside

Nestled in a peaceful pocket of Scarsdale, New York sits an original, Dutch Colonial Home listed on the market for a relatively tame price of $1.395 million, reflecting a softening market in one of the Empire State’s wealthiest suburbs. While the house includes charming features — such as a picturesque, freshwater spring pond — what is even more noteworthy is the estate’s rich history. The house’s listing price is roughly in line with what Zillow notes is Scarsdale’s median home price of just over $1 million. Prices in the ritzy NY suburb — where a federal cap on home tax deductions have begun to scare away potential buyers — have dropped over 5 percent since 2017, but are expected to climb anew in the next year. The Underhill House, located at 1020 Post Road, is th...

Here’s what could happen to your Kenmore warranty with Sears filing for bankruptcy

Your Sears warranty is probably safe at least for now. 

The best time to book holiday travel is right now

It's not even Halloween, yet this is the best time to start planning for Christmas.

CBS should hire a woman as its new CEO — and industry insiders have some suggestions

CBS has a rare opportunity to change the course of history after being mired in sexual misconduct scandals.

Artificial intelligence is changing how investors’ money is being managed

The Dow Jones Industrial Average shed more than 1,300 points earlier this month in the most dramatic drop since February. If you are a client of Morgan Stanley Wealth Management, you may have received a message from your financial advisor. The purpose of the message would be to tell you exactly what happened in the market and what the firm’s investment professionals are saying about it. It would also tell you your portfolio’s current probability of success in light of recent events. The email would come from your financial advisor. But behind the scenes, they are getting help from a source you might not expect: artificial intelligence. Morgan Stanley is one firm experimenting with how these new technologies can be applied to better manage clients’ money. Artificial intell...

As a voodoo-practicing advisor is convicted, here’s how to avoid the nightmare of bad money advice

We’ve all heard of voodoo economics, but voodoo investing? Noted Washington, D.C.-area radio personality and former financial advisor Dawn Bennett was convicted earlier this week of fraud, found to have bilked 46 listeners, advisory clients and friends who trusted her out of some $20 million in a Ponzi scheme. Prosecutors say she used voodoo in an otherworldly attempt to escape justice. Founder and CEO of Bennett Group Financial Services (now a defunct firm) and the host of weekly radio program “Financial Myth Busting with Dawn Bennett,” Bennett reportedly used investor money to pay Hindu priests in India for ceremonies to ward off investigators looking into her business practices. Stranger still, she wove voodoo spells around jars of beef tongue, labeled with Securities ...

This retirement expense has hit $100,000 annually — and it’s rising

This retirement living expense has nowhere to go but up. The annual cost of a private room in a nursing home has cracked the six-figure mark, according to Genworth Financial. The national annual median cost of a private room in a nursing home is $100,375, the insurer found in its 2018 Cost of Care study. Overall, the rising cost of care has outpaced inflation. The Consumer Price Index for all urban consumers was 2.1 percent for the first half of 2018. The annual median cost of a room at an assisted living facility grew by 6.67 percent between 2017 and 2018. Meanwhile, the cost of a shared room in a nursing home jumped by 4.11 percent. “These costs are outpacing the U.S. inflation rate, which is becoming greater competition when it comes to our wallet share,” said Gordon Saunder...

Why one investor thinks the market need a 15 percent correction as a ‘gut check’ for the rally

The S&P 500 is having its worst month in nearly three years. But the worst has yet to come for the stock market, according to Jim Paulsen, chief investment strategist at Leuthold Group.

Mega Millions jackpot surges to $1.6 billion. If you win, here’s how to avoid big mistakes

After no one hit all winning numbers in Friday night’s Mega Millions drawing, the jackpot has surged to a staggering $1.6 billion — the largest prize in U.S. lottery history. And at some point, someone will get really lucky. As in really, really lucky. Your chance of winning the Mega Millions jackpot is pretty dismal: 1 in 302.6 million. Prior to last October, when changes were made to the game, it was 1 in 258.9 million. With the odds of winning stacked against players, no one has hit the jackpot since July when a group of coworkers in California won $543 million. The Powerball jackpot, meanwhile, has climbed to $470 million. Your chance of winning it is 1 in 292 million. Play both lotteries? The chance of winning both is at least 1 in 88 quadrillion (that’s 88 followed by 15 ...

Powerball now at $620 million, while Mega Millions jackpot hits $1.6 billion. Do this if you win

The games continue: No one won Saturday’s Powerball drawing which now swells to $620 million. And after no one hit all winning numbers in Friday night’s Mega Millions drawing, that jackpot has surged to a staggering $1.6 billion — the largest prize in U.S. lottery history. Yet at some point, someone will get really lucky. As in really, really, really lucky. Your chance of winning the Mega Millions jackpot, though, is pretty dismal: 1 in 302.6 million. Prior to last October, when changes were made to the game, it was 1 in 258.9 million. With the odds of winning stacked against players, no one has hit that jackpot since July when a group of coworkers in California won $543 million. The Powerball jackpot, meanwhile, has climbed to $620 million after no one won in Saturday night...

Cramer Remix: It’s not a good time to be a company like United Rentals

Jim Cramer outlines why the industrial giant is getting beaten down by the bears in an aggressive-Fed environment.

Cramer’s memo to the Fed: Consider the jobs being wiped out by technology before hiking rates

Jim Cramer emphasizes the power of Silicon Valley when it comes to countering inflation in the workforce.